11390203_884562388251918_2875034059174715991_n
Image

June 10: National Day of Action for Nan-Hui Jo

From #StandWithNanHui:

On Wednesday, June 10, join the National Day of Action for Nan-Hui and tell ICE: Release Nan-Hui so she can reunite with her daughter!

Now, more than ever, we need your support to demand that ICE release Nan-Hui immediately so she can reunite with her daughter. Despite the fact that Nan-Hui has multiple immigration applications pending, including a VAWA (Violence Against Women Act) petition, ICE is still rushing to deport her. Recently, ICE filed a motion to cancel her immigration court hearing scheduled for August. Why is ICE so intent on deporting a mother away from her daughter?

Meanwhile, Nan-Hui continues to pass the weeks in a detention center that does not get any sunlight, where inmates are not even allowed outdoors to exercise.

Will you join us in taking action for Nan-Hui Jo and her six-year-old girl?

6/10/15 National Day of Action for Nan-Hui Jo

10am – 5pm PST, everywhere

Make calls, emails, and faxes to ICE!

Toolkit with scripts and resources coming soon.

Follow our Facebook event for more updates and details to come.

Organizations: Sign up here to get involved in the June 10th National Day of Action for Nan-Hui!

For questions, or to get involved, please contact standwithnanhui@gmail.com.

Support black feminist project marking 10 year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina

ECOHYBRIDITY a visual [black] opera in 5 movements from Jazzmin Franklin on Vimeo.

Please donate or share our Indiegogo: indiegogo.com/projects/gallery-of-the-streets/x/10885400#/story

ECOHYBRIDITY is a collaborative partnership with New Orleans-based artists and organizers. The visual opera marks the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina and looks at issues connected to disaster capitalism, spatial inequities, the prison industrial complex, and privatization from a Black feminist lens. A large-scale production featuring roving performances and site-specific installations throughout post-Katrina New Orleans, the plot follows a group of nomadic “SONGBIRDS” as they journey to recover and reclaim Home.

The visual opera draws on the vision, memory, and skills of New Orleans-based Black feminist artists and organizers—many of whom survived Katrina. Through on-going convening, documentation, evaluation, art-making, and collective study, we focus and drive the opera’s content, movements, mapping and impact(s). We are also developing ways to support those who are experiencing trauma during this 10th anniversary period.

set design by Shana griffin at Assemblage

The Feminist Wire #SayHerName: Toward a Gender Inclusive Analysis of State Violence, a document highlighting stories of Black women who have been killed by police and shining a light on gender and sexuality specific forms of police brutality often experienced by Black women such as sexual assault, police violence against pregnant and mothering women, and police abuse of lesbian, bisexual, transgender, gender nonconforming Black women.

Originally posted on United Against Police Terror - San Diego:

image

image

image

http://thefeministwire.com/#article/28575
Today the African American Policy Forum, the Center for Intersectionality and Social Policy Studies at Columbia University and Andrea Ritchie, Soros Justice Fellow and expert on policing of women and LGBT people of color released #SayHerName: Toward a Gender Inclusive Analysis of State Violence, a document highlighting stories of Black women who have been killed by police and shining a light on gender and sexuality specific forms of police brutality often experienced by Black women such as sexual assault, police violence against pregnant and mothering women, and police abuse of lesbian, bisexual, transgender, gender nonconforming Black women.

The report’s release is timed to support mobilization for a National Day of Action on Black Women and Girls called by Black Youth Project 100, Ferguson Action, and #BlackLivesMatter on May 21st. It is intended to serve as a resource for the media, organizers, researchers, policy makers and other stakeholders to better…

View original 256 more words

Report: Black Women in San Francisco Are Nearly Half of City’s Female Arrests | News | BET

inciteblog:

From the report: “San Francisco’s uniquely large disparities in the arrest rates of African Americans versus other races have been repeatedly reported…yet little has been done. New figures show these disparities have worsened in recent years. Today, black women — 6% of SF’s female population — constitute nearly half of all female arrests, and are arrested at rates 13 times higher than women of other races.”

Download report here (pdf):
http://www.cjcj.org/uploads/cjcj/documents/disproportionate_arrests_in_san_francisco.pdf

Originally posted on United Against Police Terror - San Diego:

View original

May 21: A CALL TO ACTION TO END STATE VIOLENCE AGAINST BLACK WOMEN AND GIRLS (UPDATED!)

BWM521UPDATE: A regularly updated list of actions across the US can be found HERE. So far, actions are currently organized in Chicago, ILNew York, NYColumbus, OHOakland, CAMiami, FLNew Orleans, LALouisville, KYLexington, KYAnn Arbor, MIIndianapolis, INCharlotte, NCSeattle, WAAsheville, NCMinneapolis, MNAustin, TXNashville, TN

Black Youth Project 100, Ferguson Action, and #BlackLivesMatter have called a

National Day of Action to End State Violence Against Black Women and Girls:

THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2015

 JOIN in mourning the lives of Black women and girls lost to police violence, and in lifting up the voices, experiences and demands of Black women targeted by police!

Black women – queer and not queer, transgender and not transgender – are killed, beaten, profiled, and harassed by police across the country in many of the same ways as Black men, whether it’s “broken windows policing,” “driving while Black,” or the “war on drugs.” For example:

  • Racial profiling studies analyzing the experiences of Black women separately from those of men of color conclude “for both men and women there is an identical pattern of stops by race/ethnicity.”
  • In New York City, racial disparities in stops are the same for Black women as they are for Black men: over the past 5 years, over 50% of stops of women were of Black women, and 55% of stops of men were of Black men. According to the 2010 Census, only 27% of New York City’s population is Black.
  • Data recently released by the Missouri Attorney General’s office shows that in Ferguson, MO, more Black women drivers are stopped than any other group.

Black women also experience gender and sexuality specific forms of profiling and police violence – including sexual violence and assault by police, profiling for prostitution-related offenses, and police violence against pregnant Black women and mothers. For example:

  • One study found that sexual assault by police is the second most commonly reported form of police misconduct.
  • Another found that the majority (76%) of victims of on-duty police sexual misconduct are adults, but almost a quarter (24%) of reported cases of on-duty sexual misconduct involved minors.
  • According to the National Transgender Discrimination Survey, 38% of Black transgender people who had interactions with police reported harassment, 14% reported physical assault, and 6% reported sexual assault.
  • A New York City study found that found that up to 2 in 5 young women reported sexual harassment by law enforcement.

It’s time to break the silence around Black women and police violence – because #BlackWomensLivesMatter!

Join the National Day of Action!

Here are 5 things you can do in your area:

  • Talk to 5 friends or host a kitchen table conversation about Black women and policing – for ideas, check out this workshop: http://bit.ly/1KSpPaK
  • Hold a vigil or a gathering focused on Black women in your community who have been killed or harmed by police
  • Conduct a “know your rights” training for Black women using this brochure: http://bit.ly/1L7DP1h
  • Call your Congressperson and Senator and ask them to sponsor and pass the End Racial Profiling Act of 2015 (H.R. 1933/ S. 1056), which for the first time would ban profiling based on gender, gender identity, and sexual orientation in addition to race, national origin and religion!
  • Call or go to your local police department or City Council and give them a list of demands on behalf of Black women – check out the demands below!

Join the conversation on Twitter using hashtags #SayHerName #BlackWomensLivesmatter #BlackWomenMatter #AllBlackLivesMatter

Some things you can push for your local police department to do to prevent police abuse of Black women:

  1. End “broken windows” policing practices, including laws used to criminalize homelessness and poverty
  2. Enact and enforce a “zero tolerance” policy toward sexual harassment and assault of members of the public by police officers;
  3. Stop profiling us! Adopt and enforce a ban on officers confiscating or using mere possession or presence of condoms as evidence of any prostitution-related offense;
  4. Adopt and enforce a policy requiring officers to respect Black women’s gender identity and expression in all police interactions, searches, and police detention and explicitly banning officers from profiling people based on gender identity or expression or searching people to assign gender;
  5. Ensure that use of force policies clearly prohibit use of TASERs and excessive force on pregnant women or children;
  6. Enact and enforce policies requiring police to make every effort to identify kinship care for children of parents taken into custody before contacting child protective services.

For more organizing ideas, check out INCITE!’s Organizer’s Toolkit on Law Enforcement Violence Against Women of Color and Trans People of Color: http://bit.ly/1Hnbe9D
Palmcards and brochures available here: http://bit.ly/1FfoJ7L and here: 
http://bit.ly/1QRWG3v

Questions? Looking for more resources?

Contact Andrea Ritchie, Soros Justice Fellow at: andreajritchie@gmail.com

lev-webgraphic5

mural-12th-adn-chicon

Leading up to this Mother’s Day, members of Mama Sana/Vibrant Woman and our partner organizations will release the first in a series of reports entitled Austin – A “Family-Friendly” City: Perspectives and Solutions from Mothers in the City, which calls into question Austin’s family-friendly reputation. Check out the full report here:
https://mamasanaclinic.files.wordpress.com/2015/05/mamasana-book-final.pdf

Mama Sana/Vibrant Woman, in partnership with allgo and Austin Immigrant Rights Coalition (AIRC), will hold a press conference at City Hall on Thursday, May 7, 9 – 10 am to launch the report and provide recommendations for city government to address current racial and socio-economic inequities in Austin. Members of our groups, Mayor Steve Adler, City Council Member Delia Garza, and others will speak.

Also on Thursday, May 7, at 6:30 pm, the Austin City Council will have a public hearing to discuss whether city government should implement an EQUITY ASSESSMENT TOOL, as recommended in the report. This is an effort to encourage the city to prioritize those policies and decisions that make Austin MORE EQUITABLE. Mama Sana/Vibrant Woman, Austin Immigrant Rights Coalition, and allgo are working together to move this forward. COME OUT AND TESTIFY IN SUPPORT OF THIS RESOLUTION. If you are not interested in speaking, please come, be counted, and stand in solidarity with us! Help us make sure that Austin policies do not continue to increase the racial and economic divide in the city. PLEASE JOIN US AT 6:30 PM AT CITY HALL TO TESTIFY AND SHARE YOUR STORY!!! (We will provide childcare and light snacks in city hall lobby)

Please join us in wearing white tops so that our numbers can be represented there. Follow us on twitter at @mamasanaclinic or check our FB page Mama Sana/Vibrant Woman to see real time updates of Thursday’s hearing.

HERE IS HOW TO SUPPORT WHEREVER YOU ARE:

-If not in Austin- Make Calls and Send Emails to City Council Members to let them know you support the report recommendations.

In Austin–Testify at the public hearing at city hall Thursday May 7th 6:30pm. Share your stories about whether Austin is truly a “Family-Friendly” city for all. Please join us in wearing a white top so our numbers can be represented there.
Attend the press conference May 7th 9-10 am at City Hall. 

Talking Points for calls/emails to City Hall:

–Share your name and what district you live in
–Let them know that you agree with the findings in the report and support it’s recommendations, including:

1) Develop and implement an equity assessment tool to guide all policy-making endeavors of the city; and
2) support demonstration projects that directly address health inequities affecting pregnant women individually and collectively in Austin.

–Ask them to take action to ensure these recommendations are implemented in 2015.

Contact Info for Mayor and City Council Members:

Mayor Stephen Adler512-978-2100steve.adler@austintexas.gov
District 1 Council Member Ora Houston512-978-2101ora.houston@austintexas.gov
District 2 Council Member Delia Garza512-978-2102delia.garza@austintexas.gov
District 3 Council Member Sabino “Pio” Renteria, 512-978-2103sabino.renteria@austintexas.gov
District 4 Council Member Gregorio “Greg” Casar512-978-2104gregorio.casar@austintexas.gov
District 5 Council Member Ann Kitchen512-978-2105ann.kitchen@austintexas.gov
District 6 Council Member Don Zimmerman, 512-978-2106don.zimmerman@austintexas.gov
District 7 Council Member Leslie Pool, 512-978-2107leslie.pool@austintexas.gov
District 8 Council Member Ellen Troxclair512-978-2108ellen.troxlcair@austintexas.gov
District 9 Council Member Kathie Tovo512-978-2109kathie.tovo@austintexas.gov
District 10 Council Member Sheri Gallo512-978-2110sheri.gallo@austintexas.gov

Mama Sana/Vibrant Woman Clinic Releases New Report Examining Racial Inequities In Austin, Texas!

inciteblog:

“This Mother’s Day, we want more than flowers and cards – we want the city of Austin to take action to support the health and wellness of ALL our mothers and babies, and ALL our families,” says Kellee Coleman, Mama Sana/Vibrant Woman Program Coordinator. 

Check out their Mama Sana/Vibrant Woman’s recent report examining institutional racism in Austin, and ways to support their work—which includes the development of an equity assessment tool and a call to support for demonstration projects thatdirectly address inequities faced by low-income women of color—here: 

https://mamasanaclinic.wordpress.com/2015/05/02/mama-sanavibrant-woman-clinics-releases-new-report-examining-racial-inequities-in-austin-texas/ 

Originally posted on mamasanaclinic:

Austin is recognized as a “family-friendly” city but is this true for all of its residents? Mama Sana/Vibrant Woman, a women’s health project of Mamas of Color Rising*, presents community-based participatory research that calls into question Austin’s reputation as a family-friendly city for the majority of its residents. The research looks at key indicators that affect the health and well-being of families and evaluates the lived experience for low-income women of color and their families in Austin. The methods include focus groups and surveys as well as individual and group interviews. Taken together, the primary and secondary data provide key insights that show that race and class impact how well families thrive and even survive in Austin.

This report offers concrete recommendations to city government and to the community at large in order to move Austin towards becoming a model city in equitable development.

Check out Full Report Here.


Here…

View original 161 more words