For Bresha On Her 15th Birthday

sketch1470948627641 (Image: Kara Rodriguez )

We write this post for Bresha Meadows, on this, her 15th birthday. As Black and Brown organizers, many of whom have experienced violence in our own lives, it pains us that Bresha will spend this day incarcerated, rather than celebrating her life at home with her family. On July 28, acting in her own defense, and in defense of her mother, Bresha allegedly took the life of her father, Jonathan Meadows.

Jonathan Meadows was killed with his own gun — a firearm he is said to have repeatedly pointed at his own family, throughout the years of abuse they suffered. It is well documented that abusers with a history of violence are five times more likely to subsequently murder an intimate partner if there is a firearm in the home. Brandi, Bresha’s mother, was trapped in a cycle of violence, that both she and Bresha had…

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Night Out for Safety and Liberation on August 2nd

From Allied Media Projects:

Allied Media Projects is excited to partner with local and national organizations, including the Restaurant Opportunities Center of Michigan and the Ella Baker Center of Human Rights, to present the “Night Out for Safety and Liberation” on Tuesday, August 2, 2016, 5:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. at the Detroit Public Library. The event in Detroit is one of several events taking place in 20 cities across the country, that aim to redefine what safety means in our communities, beyond the current frame of safety through policing.

The National Night Out for Safety and Liberation’s mission is to “start a different conversation about what #SafetyIs—one that is focused on how we can build equity, power, and opportunity in our communities.” In the context of police brutality and mass criminalization in black and brown communities, the question organizers of the event are asking is: “Does an increased police presence in a community necessarily translate to more safety?”

AMP invites our network of media-based organizers to participate in this important national conversation about what safety and liberation means for our communities. How do we use art, media, and technology to change the narrative of safety? How can we shift public policy from prioritizing policing, incarceration, and surveillance to instead prioritizing investment in Black and Brown communities and the creation of a stronger social safety net?

SafetyIs
Photo Taina Vargas-Edmond

Organizers of the event in Detroit shared this description:

“On Night Out for Safety and Liberation, we will bring together people with powerful visions for the future: a cross-section of community leaders, thinkers, artists and activists from all around Detroit. Together, we will envision building safe communities where public resources are reinvested from a wasteful criminal legal system and invested in other ways to ensure community safety and accountability like restorative justice hubs and peacekeepers.”

SafetyIs
Photo Tawana Petty

To kick off the event, the the Ella Baker Center for Human Rights will host a 1 hour TweetChat on Tuesday, August 2nd at 2pm EST. The TweetChat is an online conversation that will take place on Twitter. Participants can tweet their questions to @EllaBakerCenter using the hashtag #SafetyIs and or #NOSL16. Organizations can register for the TweetChat in advance here.

Stay up to date on the Night Out for Safety and Liberation Facebook page and Detroit event page.

On Sex Work & Survival: Why We Must Stand With Alisha Walker

Transformative Spaces

The Chicago Sun-Times not only saw fit to publish…

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Navigating Neoliberalism in the Academy, Nonprofits, and Beyond

The Octopus, drawing by Nicci Yin Created as part of the presentation “The Octopus: Cognitive Capitalism and the University” with Natalia Cecire and Miriam Neptune at The Scholar & Feminist 2015: Action on Education

The Octopus, drawing by Nicci Yin

Scholar & Feminist Online has published an exciting collection of articles & videos that builds from the reflections in INCITE’s 2007 anthology, The Revolution Will Not Be Funded: Beyond the Nonprofit Industrial Complex! This important multimedia resource is entitled Navigating Neoliberalism in the Academy, Nonprofits, and Beyond, and edited by Soniya Munshi and Craig Willse. The editors outline the core goal of the issue:

The essays that comprise this special issue tackle the nonprofit and school as two key sites in which neoliberal social and economic reforms are both constituted and contested. The issue demonstrates that these two realms are not distinct, but are deeply implicated in one another, often in joint projects of producing for neoliberalism—producing knowledge and producing communities. Put simply, this collection asks: What are the possibilities for transformative politics given the capacity of neoliberal capital to incorporate, absorb and/or neutralize demands for social justice? And what can we produce in excess of neoliberalism? Considering the nonprofit and the university together offers an opportunity to rethink the relationships between activism and scholarship, as well as a chance to re-theorize neoliberalism from the bottom up.

Check it out now!  To purchase The Revolution Will Not Be Funded anthology, it’s now available as an e-book

Oct 22nd: #SurvivedAndPunished Twitter Discussion

#SurvivedAndPunished Twitter Discussion

Thursday, Oct 22, 2015​
11am PT / 2pm ET

Everywhere!Join us on twitter to discuss connections between prisons, policing, immigration enforcement, and gender violence, and organize more support for survivors of domestic and sexual violence who are behind bars or trapped within systems of punishment.

Use #SurvivedAndPunished and #DVAM2015
More memes HERE. Subscribe to the SurvivedAndPunished twitter list.

Facilitated by @freemarissanow, organized by @standwithnanhui, @womenprisoners, @loveprotectorg, and @freemarissanow

More about the SurvivedAndPunished project: http://www.survivedandpunished.org