#FreeBresha DAYS OF ACTION: OCT 5 & 6

#FreeBresha DAYS OF ACTION: OCT 5 & 6

by Molly Crabapple (2016)

by Molly Crabapple (2016)

Bresha has an important court hearing on Thursday, Oct 6th when the prosecutor will determine if Bresha will be prosecuted for a crime (possibly charged as an adult) instead of given the support & safety that she needs.

We take action in solidarity with Bresha and demand that she is returned home to her family and that all charges against her are dropped.  We call on #SayHerName / #BlackLivesMatter supporters, victim advocates, feminists, racial justice activists, young people, and people of faith to take action in solidarity with Bresha and all survivors of domestic & sexual violence who are criminalized for surviving.

Events are being planned across the US! Visit here and here for an updated list. We want to help promote your event! Please send us info about your action.


  1. TAKE DIRECT ACTION! On Oct 5th & 6th, organize a march & rally, a speak out, a vigil, a flash mob dance party, a concert, a block party, or a fundraiser. Use media! Create zines, short videos, postcards, music, and poetry.
  2. DONATE to the fund to support Bresha Meadows’ freedom:https://www.gofundme.com/BreshaM

  3. SIGN the petition to demand that Trumbull County Prosecutor, Dennis Watkins, drop the charges against Bresha and free her now:bit.ly/FreeBreshaNow

  4. WRITE letters of encouragement and support to Bresha and send to: Bresha Meadows, c/o Ian N. Friedman, Esq., Friedman & Nemecek, L.L.C., The IMG Center, 1360 E. 9th Street, Suite 650, Cleveland, Ohio 44114
  5. JOIN the “Open Letter to Dennis Watkins” project. Send us an open letter to Prosecutor Dennis Watkins who has the discretion to decide to drop charges against Bresha. https://freebresha.wordpress.com/open-letters/

  6. EDUCATE communities about the criminalization of black girls and survivors of domestic violence! Organize discussions and workshops about domestic and sexual violence, explore community strategies for safety and support, resist the criminalization of our communities.
    Educational Resources:
    #FreeBresha curriculum template
    *  fact sheet on domestic violence and the criminalization of girls
    * educational tools at survivedandpunished.org and No Selves to Defend

  7. ENDORSE the call to free Bresha Meadows. Urge your campus, organization, union, faith community, or collective to endorse the statement posted by Love & Protect:  http://loveandprotect.org/bresha-meadows/

  8. CONNECT WITH FAITH COMMUNITIES. If you are part of a faith community, join community prayer sessions for Bresha’s freedom and mobilize your community. More here:https://freebresha.wordpress.com/faith/

  9. SPREAD THE WORD with friends, families, communities, co-workers, and via social media. Write letters to the editor to your local news media. Blog, tweet, and spread the word on social media. #FreeBresha

Let us know what you’re up to!  Stay in touch via e-mail atFreeBreshaMeadows@gmail.com or connect with us @FreeBresha on twitterand facebook. All updates can be found at freebresha.wordpress.com.


Night Out for Safety and Liberation on August 2nd

From Allied Media Projects:

Allied Media Projects is excited to partner with local and national organizations, including the Restaurant Opportunities Center of Michigan and the Ella Baker Center of Human Rights, to present the “Night Out for Safety and Liberation” on Tuesday, August 2, 2016, 5:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. at the Detroit Public Library. The event in Detroit is one of several events taking place in 20 cities across the country, that aim to redefine what safety means in our communities, beyond the current frame of safety through policing.

The National Night Out for Safety and Liberation’s mission is to “start a different conversation about what #SafetyIs—one that is focused on how we can build equity, power, and opportunity in our communities.” In the context of police brutality and mass criminalization in black and brown communities, the question organizers of the event are asking is: “Does an increased police presence in a community necessarily translate to more safety?”

AMP invites our network of media-based organizers to participate in this important national conversation about what safety and liberation means for our communities. How do we use art, media, and technology to change the narrative of safety? How can we shift public policy from prioritizing policing, incarceration, and surveillance to instead prioritizing investment in Black and Brown communities and the creation of a stronger social safety net?


Photo Taina Vargas-Edmond

Organizers of the event in Detroit shared this description:

“On Night Out for Safety and Liberation, we will bring together people with powerful visions for the future: a cross-section of community leaders, thinkers, artists and activists from all around Detroit. Together, we will envision building safe communities where public resources are reinvested from a wasteful criminal legal system and invested in other ways to ensure community safety and accountability like restorative justice hubs and peacekeepers.”

Photo Tawana Petty

To kick off the event, the the Ella Baker Center for Human Rights will host a 1 hour TweetChat on Tuesday, August 2nd at 2pm EST. The TweetChat is an online conversation that will take place on Twitter. Participants can tweet their questions to @EllaBakerCenter using the hashtag #SafetyIs and or #NOSL16. Organizations can register for the TweetChat in advance here.

Stay up to date on the Night Out for Safety and Liberation Facebook page and Detroit event page.

Ecohybridity – Love Song for NOLA

#‎Ecohybridity‬ ‪#‎NOLA‬ Mourning the missing and the lost, and the 100,000 Black folks displaced who haven't been able to make it home. This is the levee that was breached in 2005. Photo by Puck Lo

#‎Ecohybridity‬ ‪#‎NOLA‬ Mourning the missing and the lost, and the 100,000 Black folks displaced who haven’t been able to make it home. This is the levee that was breached in 2005. Photo by Puck Lo

New Orleans-based black feminist artists & organizers recently curatedEcohybridity – Love Song for NOLA,” a visual black opera set in various New Orleans neighborhoods.  The visual opera marks the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina and looks at issues connected to disaster capitalism, spatial inequities, the prison industrial complex, and privatization from a Black feminist lens.

An article about the opera can be found on ColorLines. Excerpts are below.

Artist and Ecohybridity creator, Kai Barrow:

Opera was originally a people’s form that would go from community to community. It was a way to articulate what was going on through art. But somewhere along the line, it became an elitist form, and poor people of color were locked out of the medium. But our conditioning right now, how we’re managing to exist, is opera in its largest sense. It’s comedy, it’s tragedy, it’s all of these different parts.

S. Mandisa Moore-O’Neal, a New Orleans native and Echohybridity writer and performer:

Right now is such a tender time for so many of us in the Gulf who have roots and history in this place. As a local black feminist, rebuilding and resistance looks like rendering ourselves visible over these last 10 years and well before. [It means] telling the complex stories of black women and girls—trans and not-trans, of course—on our terms, in our voices.

More about EcoHybridity here: http://galleryofthestreets.org/ecohybridity1/




Chicago, June 28: Freedom Beyond Occupation & Incarceration

Freedom Beyond Occupation & Incarceration
An Afternoon with Angela Davis & Rasmea Odeh

Sunday, June 28th, 2:30pm
University of Il. Chicago (UIC)
750 S. Halsted St, Student Center East
Illinois Room, 3rd Floor
Chicago, IL


Organized by:
The Rasmea Defense Committee
Black Lives Matter Chicago
Black on Both Sides
Black Youth Project 100
Chicago Alliance Against Racist and Political Repression
Coalition to Protect People’s Rights
Committe Against Political Repression
Committee to Stop FBI Repression
Southside Together Organizing for Power/Fearless Leading by the Youth
U.S. Palestinian Community Network
We Charge Genocide


Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/500741273406478/


June 10: National Day of Action for Nan-Hui Jo

From #StandWithNanHui:

On Wednesday, June 10, join the National Day of Action for Nan-Hui and tell ICE: Release Nan-Hui so she can reunite with her daughter!

Now, more than ever, we need your support to demand that ICE release Nan-Hui immediately so she can reunite with her daughter. Despite the fact that Nan-Hui has multiple immigration applications pending, including a VAWA (Violence Against Women Act) petition, ICE is still rushing to deport her. Recently, ICE filed a motion to cancel her immigration court hearing scheduled for August. Why is ICE so intent on deporting a mother away from her daughter?

Meanwhile, Nan-Hui continues to pass the weeks in a detention center that does not get any sunlight, where inmates are not even allowed outdoors to exercise.

Will you join us in taking action for Nan-Hui Jo and her six-year-old girl?

6/10/15 National Day of Action for Nan-Hui Jo

10am – 5pm PST, everywhere

Make calls, emails, and faxes to ICE!

Toolkit with scripts and resources coming soon.

Follow our Facebook event for more updates and details to come.

Organizations: Sign up here to get involved in the June 10th National Day of Action for Nan-Hui!

For questions, or to get involved, please contact standwithnanhui@gmail.com.


BWM521UPDATE: A regularly updated list of actions across the US can be found HERE. So far, actions are currently organized in Chicago, ILNew York, NYColumbus, OHOakland, CAMiami, FLNew Orleans, LALouisville, KYLexington, KYAnn Arbor, MIIndianapolis, INCharlotte, NCSeattle, WAAsheville, NCMinneapolis, MNAustin, TXNashville, TN

Black Youth Project 100, Ferguson Action, and #BlackLivesMatter have called a

National Day of Action to End State Violence Against Black Women and Girls:

THURSDAY, MAY 21, 2015

 JOIN in mourning the lives of Black women and girls lost to police violence, and in lifting up the voices, experiences and demands of Black women targeted by police!

Black women – queer and not queer, transgender and not transgender – are killed, beaten, profiled, and harassed by police across the country in many of the same ways as Black men, whether it’s “broken windows policing,” “driving while Black,” or the “war on drugs.” For example:

  • Racial profiling studies analyzing the experiences of Black women separately from those of men of color conclude “for both men and women there is an identical pattern of stops by race/ethnicity.”
  • In New York City, racial disparities in stops are the same for Black women as they are for Black men: over the past 5 years, over 50% of stops of women were of Black women, and 55% of stops of men were of Black men. According to the 2010 Census, only 27% of New York City’s population is Black.
  • Data recently released by the Missouri Attorney General’s office shows that in Ferguson, MO, more Black women drivers are stopped than any other group.

Black women also experience gender and sexuality specific forms of profiling and police violence – including sexual violence and assault by police, profiling for prostitution-related offenses, and police violence against pregnant Black women and mothers. For example:

  • One study found that sexual assault by police is the second most commonly reported form of police misconduct.
  • Another found that the majority (76%) of victims of on-duty police sexual misconduct are adults, but almost a quarter (24%) of reported cases of on-duty sexual misconduct involved minors.
  • According to the National Transgender Discrimination Survey, 38% of Black transgender people who had interactions with police reported harassment, 14% reported physical assault, and 6% reported sexual assault.
  • A New York City study found that found that up to 2 in 5 young women reported sexual harassment by law enforcement.

It’s time to break the silence around Black women and police violence – because #BlackWomensLivesMatter!

Join the National Day of Action!

Here are 5 things you can do in your area:

  • Talk to 5 friends or host a kitchen table conversation about Black women and policing – for ideas, check out this workshop: http://bit.ly/1KSpPaK
  • Hold a vigil or a gathering focused on Black women in your community who have been killed or harmed by police
  • Conduct a “know your rights” training for Black women using this brochure: http://bit.ly/1L7DP1h
  • Call your Congressperson and Senator and ask them to sponsor and pass the End Racial Profiling Act of 2015 (H.R. 1933/ S. 1056), which for the first time would ban profiling based on gender, gender identity, and sexual orientation in addition to race, national origin and religion!
  • Call or go to your local police department or City Council and give them a list of demands on behalf of Black women – check out the demands below!

Join the conversation on Twitter using hashtags #SayHerName #BlackWomensLivesmatter #BlackWomenMatter #AllBlackLivesMatter

Some things you can push for your local police department to do to prevent police abuse of Black women:

  1. End “broken windows” policing practices, including laws used to criminalize homelessness and poverty
  2. Enact and enforce a “zero tolerance” policy toward sexual harassment and assault of members of the public by police officers;
  3. Stop profiling us! Adopt and enforce a ban on officers confiscating or using mere possession or presence of condoms as evidence of any prostitution-related offense;
  4. Adopt and enforce a policy requiring officers to respect Black women’s gender identity and expression in all police interactions, searches, and police detention and explicitly banning officers from profiling people based on gender identity or expression or searching people to assign gender;
  5. Ensure that use of force policies clearly prohibit use of TASERs and excessive force on pregnant women or children;
  6. Enact and enforce policies requiring police to make every effort to identify kinship care for children of parents taken into custody before contacting child protective services.

For more organizing ideas, check out INCITE!’s Organizer’s Toolkit on Law Enforcement Violence Against Women of Color and Trans People of Color: http://bit.ly/1Hnbe9D
Palmcards and brochures available here: http://bit.ly/1FfoJ7L and here: 

Questions? Looking for more resources?

Contact Andrea Ritchie, Soros Justice Fellow at: andreajritchie@gmail.com