COV4 Call for Proposals: Extended Deadline – September 15th!

Color of Violence 4 (COV4) Call for Proposals:
EXTENDED DEADLINE: September 15, 2014

More about COV4:

9975648INCITE! is excited to announce the upcoming conference, Color of Violence 4 (COV4)Beyond the State: Inciting Transformative Possibilities. This gathering will mark INCITE!’s fifteen years of engaging in grassroots organizing projects, critical conversations, national actions, transnational campaigns, and community building strategies to end colonial, racial, and gender-based violence against women of color, trans and queer people of color, and our communities.

COV4 will highlight emerging strategies and new frameworks that focus on ending violence without relying on policing, mass incarceration, restrictive legislation, and other systems of violence and control.  Although on-going systems of criminalization and punishment are occupying and devastating our communities, those systems are still often considered the front-line response to violence within and against our communities.  Challenging multiple interlocking forms of violence requires new conversations and transformative approaches.

More details at the conference website: colorofviolence.org

Submit a proposal for the Growing Safer Communities Track at the 2011 Allied Media Conference

GROWING SAFER COMMUNITIES — ALLIED MEDIA CONFERENCE TRACK
Coordinators: Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha, Philly Stands Up!, Communities United Against Violence, and STOP/Critical Resistance Bay Area

Propose a Session for the Growing Safer Communities Track at this year’s Allied Media Conference, June 23-26, 2011, Detroit MI.
Submission Deadline March 21, 2011.

The Allied Media Conference will be taking place June 23-26th in Detroit, MI which unites the worlds of media and communications, technology, education and social justice.  The definition of media is extremely broad and includes pretty much any form you can think of to do organizing work!  This year there will be 19 different learning tracks focusing on topics like Participatory Design, Ending Israeli Apartheid, Disability Justice, and Science Fiction.

Please submit a session for the 2011 Allied Media Conference Growing Safer Communities track.  Putting Transformative Justice at center stage, this dynamic track is chock full of communication strategies, tools and dreams for anyone working to build safety from violence and abuse in their communities without using the police or criminal legal system! Building on last year’s successful Creating Safer Communities track, this year we’ll take conversations about transformative justice and community-based accountability to the next level. Our communities are using tools like zines, safetylabs, flip cam videos, and neighborhood safety mapping to support a safe, healing, and restorative world. We’re tapping into into potlucks, posters, story circles, weekend action camps, elder/ youth inter-generational conversations, Twitter, textmobs, stencils and oh so much more to grow these communities. This track will bring together collectives from across North America and beyond to explore the brilliant ways we’re (nonviolently) kicking butt and building the systems we need to be safe and free.

Because we have limited space for sessions, we are encouraging folks to work collaboratively with other organizers (in your region or other folks you know around the country) to pull together session proposals so that we can include as many voices and experiences as  possible.

AMC Session Proposal Details:

We are now accepting session proposals for AMC2011. Every year we get more and more awesome session proposals. We recommend that your start now on developing your session proposal. Session proposals for AMC2011 are due March 21, 2011.  We are seeking proposals that feature:

  • A clear connection to media and communications. Our definition of media includes everything from breakdancing, to building your own radio station, to web-design, fashion-design and everything in between.
  • An emphasis on strategies rather than issues.  Sessions that help us name the problem are important, but they can’t stop there.  Make sure your session proposal incorporates media-based organizing strategies towards solutions.
  • Interactivity and creativity in the session structure.  Think about session structures that will make the information accessible to multiple learning styles.  This may include a mix of: small group conversations, visual presentations of information, handouts, games and creative expression.
  • Collaboration.  We love AMC sessions designed by multiple organizations or individuals. Even better, connect your session to an ongoing organizing process that extends beyond the conference. While collaboration is strongly encouraged, we also welcome workshops from individuals and groups.

For all info, FAQs and where to submit online: http://alliedmedia.org/amc2011/news/2011/02/22/call-session-proposals-amc2011

The session proposal form is ready! Please submit to these websites:
Here, in English:  http://alliedmedia.org/amc2011/propose-session-amc2011
Aquí en Español:  http://alliedmedia.org/amc2011/propuesta-de-sesiones-para-la-amc2011

Proposals are due by March 21st! Please e-mail brownstargirl@gmail.com if you have questions and spread the word widely!

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Call for workshops and skillsharing: INCITE! at the 2011 Allied Media Conference

INCITE! Presents
a Women Trans* & Genderqueer Folks of Color Track
at the 2011 Allied Media Conference: June 23 – 26 | Detroit, MI

As women, trans* and genderqueer people of color making media that directly mingles our personal lives with the political issues we speak about, we believe that the daily intimidation we experience as a result of our work is dangerous when faced in isolation or silence. We believe, as Audre Lorde did, that “it is better to speak, knowing we were never meant to survive.” The community of support we create through the INCITE! Track at the Allied Media Conference is vital to our survival as people of color making media and organizing to end violence within our communities. Equally vital is the exchange of brilliant ideas that takes place when we come together. We are all pushing the boundaries of what media is capable of and sharing the lessons of that experience with each other, and would love you to join us in Detroit this June to do just that.

More info about the Allied Media Conference: http://alliedmediaconference.org/
More info about INCITE!: http://www.incite-national.org/
More info about INCITE!’s collaboration with AMC since 2007:
http://inciteblog.wordpress.com/2010/08/25/reflections-from-detroit-reflections-after-the-4th-annual-incite-track-at-the-amc/

ABOUT THE ALLIED MEDIA CONFERENCE:

The Allied Media Conference cultivates media strategies for a more just and creative world. Held every June in Detroit, MI, it is the primary point of intersection in the U.S. for alternative media makers and committed social justice activists from around the country.

We come together to share tools and tactics for transforming our communities through media-based organizing. The panel discussions and workshops of the AMC are hands-on and practical, intergenerational while youth-centered. They showcase the solutions emerging from places where creativity is a matter of survival. Out of the AMC, we evolve new skills and strategies to bring back to our local contexts. We deepen our relationships and expand our networks in ways that support ongoing collaboration throughout the year. 

PROPOSED SESSIONS FOR 2011 INCITE! TRACK:

Some of the sessions already proposed for this year include:

*A 3 hour skill-sharing carnival for women, trans* and genderqueer people of color of every skill level
*Gender justice caucus
*Popular Education workshops
*”This is what INCITE is, how to start a chapter” workshop
*Using media to keep our healing traditions alive
*Social Justice and Zine Making
*Motherhood and Media Organizing

We know you’ve got brilliance to spare! Please let us know if you would like to propose a workshop or be a part of the skillshare!

The skillshare is in its third year and its goal is to remind us that we already have the tools we need for our communities to thrive! Ask yourself how your skills, whether they be bike maintenance, baking, healing practice, awesome gaming, “hating” (biting, hilarious and effective breakdowns of power), DIY clothes creation, PA skills, interdependent coalition building, gardening, dancing, etc. could be used by folks to:

* sustain their community and themselves?
* create spaces for laughter and fun in movement work?
* connect with people?
* end gendered violence against people of color?
* create media justice?

Participants would go from station to station learning skills and figuring out how the skills connect to the work they are already doing in their communities. We also want to create a zine of the skills and how folks came to acquire them, so even if you are unable to participate, we’d love to get a blurb from you about how you came into doing what you do and some resources people might check out as well! We’ll also be documenting the process as well as creating mechanisms to sustain what’s shared after the conference!

To propose a skill to share, email Moya at moyazb[at]gmail[dot]com
To propose a workshop email Karla at krmtgrl[at]gmail.com[dot]com and/or Emi at hello.emik[at]gmail[dot]com.

Childcare will be available for free during the daytime hours throughout the weekend of the conference. Several workshop proposals for kids have been submitted and we are looking for more! Send any proposals for kids workshops to: jenny[at]alliedmedia[dot]org.

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Call for submissions: Online and printed zine about dealing with body/hair/size/fat phobia for and by Indigenous peoples and people of color

**PLEASE FORWARD WIDELY**

Call for submissions: Online and printed zine about dealing with body/hair/size/fat phobia for and by Indigenous peoples and people of colour.

Title: To be decided/announced.

Deadline: February 28th 2011

For far too long, I’ve have been made to always question my body. Always made to feel like if I waxed my sideburns/shaved my legs/signed up for weightwatchers/stopped eating so much roti, that I would live up to the potential of how beautiful I could be. I have learnt that these issues not only represent a complex fear of hair or fat, but is also emblematic of what my body represents as a queer brown body, constantly threatening whiteness, conformity and concepts of beauty that idealize skinny, hairless, colonized white bodies; among many other things. The internalized hate and racism that our communities and peoples have is destroying us, forcing us to dislike and alter our bodies, putting it through further violence and trauma.

As I have been attempting to work through this, I have had the honour of meeting so many beautiful Indigenous people and people of colour who constantly work hard at breaking down these ideas, who survive, love themselves and each other everyday for who they are. We need to share our struggles and triumphs; we need to know we aren’t alone in this. There are many people who have stories, facts, advice and successes on these issues to share with others.

For these reasons and more, with consultation from many over the past two years, I want to put together this zine for Indigenous people and people of colour to share, read, write, listen, learn, realize, question and start a path to working towards realizing how sexy and beautiful we already are.

Who? Self-identified Indigenous peoples and people of colour*, mixed race people* who have something to say about fat/size/hair/body image shit. (I’m talking about size, hair (both body and on your head) and anything else that affects your body/self love/ability to love others.

What? Submit art, writing, prose, poetry, essays, collages, lyrics, photos, stuff you’ve created that can be put in a zine (online) and photocopied to give out in printed copies.

Why? We need to address size/fat/hair phobia and our bodies, colonization, histories and provide resources and support for each other.

How? Please send all submissions to thisisourzine@gmail.com with SUBMISSION as the subject. If it can’t be emailed, email us and we will figure out a way to get your work submitted.

*= it’s important to remember how complex categories of race, sexuality, gender and identity are, and when I say self-identified Indigenous people and people of colour and mixed race people, I mean that if you identify as a person of colour or Indigenous person, but may not necessarily present phenotypically as a person of colour, we want you to submit to the zine.

Obviously we all have different experiences/understandings of how race, body image, sexuality, gender, ability, class, eating disorders, geography, status, etc. etc. come together and shape how we understand these issues, which will be an important string throughout this zine.

About me:

You are probably wondering: ‘who is this random person wanting me to share my work with them?’ Good question. My name is Aruna, I am a 23 year old fat brown woman identified first generation settler that is living on the occupied lands of the Mississauga’s of New Credit. I went to Queen’s University in Kingston, but am now back living with my parents in Scarborough; and this is my first zine ever, and think that this topic is incredibly important and something that people need to start talking about with each other. I’m not claiming ownership over this and want this to be a collective/loving/healing process with everyone involved. I have a lot of issues around my weight and in the process of trying to look for something to comfort and help me work through my shit, I never found anything useful. I think a project like this, if done properly will be useful to lots of people in a similar situation.

Remember! Deadline is February 28th 2011, all submissions and inquiries about submissions should be relayed to thisisourzine@gmail.com.

In your submission, please include:

-       Your name (or name you want to be published)

-       RELIABLE Contact information (in case we need to talk to you about your work)

-       A brief (50-100 word) bio or description of who you are/what you do, etc. (if you want to include it)

-       Please make sure all attachments are either in PDF, JPEG, Word, RTF, BMP or any other compatible program.

-       Your piece/submission should be in an attachment, not copy/pasted into the email. (If you have trouble with attachments, email us for help!)

Want to submit? Get involved in the planning/making of the zine?

Wanna start a larger group out of this?

Got concerns, questions, etc?

Email me at thisisourzine@gmail.com to talk and if you’d like to get involved.

Here are some points to get you thinking about the issues I feel could be repped in this zine. A couple of points have been borrowed from another callout for ‘Occupied bodies’ by Tasha Fierce that I felt was relevant to our zine.

These are merely some starting questions, submissions should in no way feel limited to this:

-       How do you embrace/love your body?

-       What tips do you have to lessen the blows from people who hate on your fat/hair/self

-       How is loving your body an act of sovereignty or decolonization (if at all)?

-       Has your self-esteem/dislike of your body hurt your sex life? How does it stop you from exploring yourself or new partners because of fear of rejection?

-       How does being mixed race affect your body image and how you see yourself? How are you excluded from these discussions because of being mixed race?

-       Does the hair and fat phobic ways of the porn industry make you angry?

-       What images of yourself were instilled in you by your parents/guardians/other family members when you were a young child?

-       If you’re queer or two-spirit, how has being two-spirit or queer of color affected your self-image and how you desire your partner to look?

-       How has your gender (whatever that may be) affected how you understand your body, or how you have been forced to see your body?

-       If you’ve had partners who were also Indigenous or of colour, did/do you gaze upon them with the same critical eye you reserve for yourself? Why or why not?

-       Have you ever worried that your choice of partners reflected negative understandings of your own bodies/self?

-       If you’re a Trans people of colour or Indigenous person, how was your perception of your gender identity shaped? How has your self/body image changed over the years and have there been any other shifts in your thinking about your self/body image?

-       How has ability and access affected your image? Affected how you love yourself?

-       What positive or negative encounters with adults as a child helped shape that image?

-       How has your body image/size phobia issues been treated in the medical field? How has mental health played a part in it?

-       What connections do you see between colonialism and your body?

-       If you weren’t born on or feel connection to Turtle Island/occupied lands that we call ‘North America’, how has the place you came from/identify with determined your ideas around your body?

-       How did the media you consumed as a child/teen shape your body/self image today? How does it complicate it? How does the media you consume NOW affect your body/self image?

-       How did pressure from family and friends affect the way you perceived yourself after you were old enough to take care of yourself?

-       How did you feel about societal beauty and body standards as a teen? Did you rebel, or conform by any means necessary to avoid confrontation?

-       How has the globalization and dissemination of the Western beauty ideal affected you and Indigenous peoples/people of colour worldwide?

-       Debunk this: “in some cultures they ______”, – deconstructing a commonly held belief about an ethnic group’s relation to body (such as the black community supposedly being OK with fat).

The list goes on and on and is by no means complete…email us for more help if needed.

For more info, write to thisisourzine@gmail.com or check out the original call for submissions, found here.

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Call for Submissions: Trans Justice and AIDS Activism Zine

Trans Justice and AIDS Activism Zine! Call for Submissions:

As a gender-non-conforming person of color, I’ve found that there are very few published
works by and for members of my community about AIDS activism and trans justice. Whether we’re struggling for trans justice and against the stigmatization and criminalization of HIV/AIDS in non-profits, prisons, community centers, shelters, unfunded collectives, immigrant detention centers, on the street or in the clinic, we all have stories that we can share and experiences we learn from and organize around. Through this zine, I’d like to share our resources, experiences, activism, political analysis, ways of surviving and expressing ourselves, ways we care for one another, in hopes of making our stories more visible and supporting one another.

I’d greatly appreciate contributions!

What is a “zine”? A zine is a collaborative “do it yourself” magazine project that uses original work. Here is an example of a individual artists pages from a transformative justice zine (www.transformativejusticezine.org):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Submissions can be any type of print media! Feel free to decorate your writing (poetry, articles and stories) with fabulous expressions of your art (collage, painting, photography and drawing)! Your submission is all about your fabulously creative artistic vision!
Submission Guideline: 2,000 word limit
Deadline: November 30, 2010 NEW DEADLINE: April 1, 2011!

Topics can be any of the following, or any another topic that you feel is related:
• Trans Justice
• AIDS Activism
• The Prison Industrial Complex
• Criminalization of HIV/AIDS
• Survival and Resiliency
• Resisting Invisibility

Also, please let me know what feels safe for you in terms of how you would like to be credited (by name, anonymous, initials, alternate name, etc). The zine will be published and copies will be sent out December 2010!

Please send submissions to:
Che Gossett
Hearts on a Wire
PO Box 36831
Philadelphia, PA 19107

chegossett@gmail.com

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Mamas Action Project + Mamas of Color Survey

A Report from Mamas of Color Rising:

Mamas Action Project

On May 9th, 2010, Mamas of Color Rising realized their first Mother’s Day Action Project to demand midwifery through Medicaid in Texas. After brainstorming and bringing their ideas together, MOCR decided that to bring awareness to the community about the midwifery model that women of color lack access to, they would hand out flowers to women of color with a palmcard attached with reasons why Medicaid in Texas SHOULD cover midwifery (reasons on posting below).

The Mamas gathered in a parking lot of a grocery store which they thought would be supportive of their work, being that the majority of their customers are families/women of color. However, the store managers failed to demonstrate interest in their work. The Mamas being the revolutionary group that they are, proceeded to gather in the parking lot and continued with their work, aware that their presence was not wanted.

As the members of MOCR approached women of color in the parking lot, offering other women a flower to acknowledge the work that they do/ did as a mother, some were surprised, perplexed, responsive, and the majority thankful. Some, even offered donations for the flower, and then it was clarified by a Mama that no donation was needed and that the flower was simply a symbol of acknowledgment from one woman of color to another.

After passing out nearly 300 carnations to women, the store security approached a member and notified her that they were not allowed to be passing out flowers. Lucky for the Mamas, they had already made contact with nearly 300 mothers with whom they had the opportunity to chat with and bring their message across to.

This moment of accomplishment within a community of motherhood had to be captured.

***

Young Women United (Albuquerque, NM) & Mamas of Color Rising (Austin, TX) also posted a nation-wide survey to find out what’s most important for mamas of color. They write:

Mamas of Color….how are you doing out there?

Concerned with the way our US society and government treats caretakers, especially poor and working class mothers of color, this survey was created by members of Young Women United in Albuquerque, NM and Mamas of Color Rising in Austin, TX as well as individual women across the country.

We put together this survey as a way to hear from you, Mamas of Color, about your experiences, feelings, ideas, and knowledge as a parent in the US. In gathering this information, we hope to identify issues affecting our lives, find common experiences and collectively organize as Mamas of Color.

revolutionarymamas@gmail.com

We are Mamas of Color, together creating a vision of how we want birthing, parenting and caretaking to be in a more just and loving world.

You can find the survey here.

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Call for Participation: Truth and Revolution: Aboriginal Women Weave the Resistance

A call for submissions from Cherry Smiley of Truth and Revolution:

Dear Sisters,

Do you, or someone you know, have a story to tell? Do you want an opportunity to tell it? I’m looking for 582 Native women to lend their stories and images for an art project about our struggles, our resistance, and our pride as Native women.

The media usually presents only one side of our stories, if that. They tell the public only about our struggles and the poor conditions of our lives. While these stories are true and shouldn’t be ignored, I want to acknowledge our full stories, all sides. I want to tell our stories of poverty and loss, but also of our resistance to these things and how we get through them. I want to tell our stories of abuse and struggle, but also of our successes, our talents, and our pride. I want the public to know the harsh realities of our lives but I also want to celebrate 518 years of our resistance in the face of colonization.

Sisters, I am respectfully asking and inviting your participation in this project. Please email truthandrevolution@gmail.com if you are interested in participating.

With Respect,

Cherry Smiley

About the Project:

As of March 2010, the Native Women’s Association of Canada had documented 582 cases of missing and murdered Aboriginal women across Canada. We all know the actual number is higher, and we all see stories about this come and go in the media. My mom and I came up with the idea for this project together. We see this project as a response to the media coverage and co-optation of our missing and murdered sisters by non-native people. We see it is a statement against colonization, racism, sexism, and violence against women. But primarily, we see it as a celebration of our strength and resistance as Native women.

This project will include 582 photographs and interviews of Native women across Canada, myself and my family included.

Some of the things we might talk about in the interviews include: the foster care system, residential schools, prostitution, physical violence, sexual violence, colonization, racism, sexism, discrimination, welfare, reserves, city life, poverty, health care, disability, addiction, employment, family, friends, survival, resistance, pride, success, traditions, stories, talents, goals, etc.

I will audio record each interview and also plan on videoing parts of the process. This project will hopefully result in 1) an installation that uses the photos, audio, and text from the interviews, 2) a (possibly self-published) book using the photographs and text from the interviews, and 3) a video project, specifics undecided at this point.

Currently, I have no budget. What I do have is respect, determination, and a desire to tell our stories. At this point, I am financing the project myself.

Eventually, I will be asking for participation all across Canada, every province and territory. For now, because of lack of funds, I am looking for Aboriginal women in and around Vancouver, BC. If you are outside this area and want to participate, please email me anyways, and let me know you’re interested. This will help to plan for the future.

I hope to complete photographs and interviews by September 2011.

Aboriginal women who want better lives for themselves and for our future generations, and who are willing to share their stories and images, are welcome to email truthandrevolution@gmail.com with your name, contact info, and a bit about yourself. Also feel free to email if you have any questions about the project, or if you are emailing on behalf of a woman who does not have access to the internet.

Women who are selected to participate will be contacted in the upcoming months.

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Language & Action

Language & Action is a new weekend feature where we spotlight some of the fantastic analysis, news, & performance from around the blogosphere that shine a light on critical ideas and action addressing violence against women of color.  The title is borrowed from Audre Lorde’s brilliant 1977 talk, “The Transformation of Silence into Language and Action.”

If you have suggestions for things to include, please send us an e-mail at incite.news@gmail.com or float it in the comment section!

***

YWEP gathering info about Bad Encounters:

Young Women’s Empowerment Project (YWEP) is collecting important info from youth in Chicago who have had crappy encounters with social services, hospitals, police, shelters, etc:

Are you having a bad experience getting help from a social service, police, hospital, shelter or some where else? Do you think this is because you are involved in the sex trade, homeless or Lesbian Gay Bisexual or Transgender or another reason- like using drugs or being involved in the street economy?

If you want to report this bad experience and help other youth in your community
CLICK HERE

Spread the word!!!

For more information about this project, check out this page.

***

Juarez-inspired makeup?

Companies use Juarez as inspiration for makeup:

Julianne Hing at Colorlines has a great write-up on MAC and Rodarte’s new cosmetic line that was inspired by the makeup designers’ trip to Juarez, Mexico, a town that has seen thousands of women murdered or disappeared.  She writes:

It seems the designers took a recent trip to the border, checking out towns from El Paso to Marfa, Texas. They came back with a fascination with Juarez in particular, and with life in the post-NAFTA maquilas that were set up to help the city become a free-trade zone. When designers Kate and Laura Mulleavy unveiled their ready-to-wear F/W 2010 in February, they said that they had been inspired by the lines of women workers who’d make their way to factory jobs in the middle of the night. Romantic, huh?

Of course, real life in Juarez, which has the distinction of being the world’s deadliest city, is much less so. By the end of July, Juarez is set to log 6,000 murders this year alone. The city is home to hundreds of factories owned by multinational corporations, and has become a bloody warzone where Mexico’s drug wars are being fought. For the last few years the violence has resulted in so many thousands of unsolved deaths, many of those killed have been women workers who were traveling to and from their jobs in Juarez’s factories.

The story includes the companies’ apologies and Hing follows up with an interview with beauty bloggers who broke this story.

***

African women and children denied housing rights and brutally attacked by police in Paris:

After watching this horrific video of African immigrant women and children being brutally attacked by police in Paris because they were negotiating for housing rights, La Macha at VivirLatino discusses the level of violence the state is willing to inflict on immigrant women and children in order to protect its borders.  She writes:

Are the protection of borders worth this? And please don’t tell me that this was the mother’s fault. I know that all the anti-immigrant people will be here soon to tell me that it’s their fault, and I can handle that. But if any supposed “ally” says “what were they thinking?” I have a few suggestions. First, sit for a moment and open yourself up to the humanity of these women and the humanity of their children. Know what it feels like to feel terror and confusion and a fear you can’t breathe through. Then take a moment to consider that even when the government offers you something, you, a black immigrant mother that may or may not be legal, may actually have considerable reason to not trust that government.

***

Intersectional analysis of Israeli “rape by deception” case:

brownfemipower at Flip Flopping Joy analyzes the recent Israeli case in which a Palestinian man was accused and found guilty of “rape by deception” after having sex with a Jewish woman who thought he was also Jewish.  She asks, “What vested interest does an apartheid regime have in criminalizing sex between classes?” and writes:

When we don’t understand that a woman’s body under such a system is *contested* and even often looked at as a *resource* for the nation/state, we stand a very good chance of grossly misunderstanding what particular situations mean.

***

Frida Kahlo: “The broken column (self-portrait)”

Recognizing each other as queer disabled women of color:

In tribute to Frida Kahlo, Mia Mingus at Leaving Evidence reflects on the power of recognition among queer disabled women of color.  She writes:

And even when we are visible as disabled queer women of color, sometimes we don’t even recognize each other.  We don’t recognize each other because we’re not taught how to do it; because we’re taught how to be afraid of each other.  Because we are taught how to not recognize each other more readily than we are taught how to find each other.  Where are we? How do we find each other? And how do we do the work to recognize each other and to be recognizable to each other?  Sometimes, as is so often the case with queerness (and disability), I see you, but I don’t know if you see me.  I feel this acutely with adoptees.  We share space together, but often times we don’t know how to recognize each other.  We look right through one another, or avoid each other as if we were taught some kind of secret script.

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Call for Survey Participants: Ending Community Violence Without Policing


Editor’s Note: Apologies for posting this after the survey deadline, but we’re keeping the post up in case folks want to connect with these groups to learn more about the research and organizing they are doing, and for ways to plug in.

Editor’s Note, Part 2!: The groups extended the survey deadline to Friday, Aug 13th!  Please submit your info!!

Connect with us!!

Creative Interventions, the Revolution Starts at Home Collective, the Safe OUTside the System Collective of the Audre Lorde Project, and the Young Women’s Empowerment Project are seeking to connect with groups who are working to reduce and eliminate violence in our communities without relying on policing and state systems.

We are hoping to build a broader network of organizations so that we can intentionally share successes, strategies and lessons learned. We are particularly interested in hearing from and connecting with other groups led by Women, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Two-Spirit, Trans, and Gender Non-Conforming People and People of Color.

Please fill out our survey by August 9th 13th 2010  http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/C8JT6KB

This survey is confidential and all responses will only be viewed by Creative Interventions, the Revolution Starts at Home Collective, the Safe OUTside the System Collective of the Audre Lorde Project, and the Young Women’s Empowerment Project.

If you have any questions, please email imcknight@alp.org

Thank you for helping to build safer communities,

Creative Interventions
Revolution Starts at Home Collective
The Safe OUTside the System Collective of the Audre Lorde Project
The Young Women’s Empowerment Project

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Call for Submissions: This Bridge Called My Baby: Legacies of Radical Mothering

An exciting call for submissions from http://thisbridgecalledmybaby.wordpress.com/:

This Bridge Called My Baby: Legacies of Radical Mothering


“We can learn to mother ourselves.” Audre Lorde, 1983

All mothers have the potential to be revolutionary. Some mothers stand on the shoreline, are born and reborn here, inside the flux of time and space, overcoming the traumatic repetition of oppression. Our very existence is disobedience to the powers that be.

At times, in moments, we as mothers choose to stand in a zone of claimed risk and fierce transformation, the frontline. In infinite ways, both practiced and yet to be imagined,  we put our bodies between the violent repetition of the norm and the future we already deserve, exactly because our children deserve it too.  We make this choice for many reasons and in different contexts, but at the core we have this in common: we refuse to obey. We refuse to give into fear. We insist on joy no matter what and by every means necessary and possible.
In this anthology we are exploring how we are informed by and participating with those mothers, especially radical women of color, who have sought for decades, if not centuries, to create relationships to each other, transformative relationships to feminism and a transnational anti-imperialist literary, cultural and everyday practice.

“We don’t want a space where kids feel that only adults can imagine ways to strengthen our communities and protect ourselves against the Architects of Despair,” Sora said, “and we don’t want adults to feel that either. We want to create a space where all of our imaginations help each other grow; but we realize that kids might get bored from sitting still the way that adults tend to do, so we set up the play room with toys and games.” -Regeneracion Childcare Collective 2007

Sometimes for radical mamas, our mothering in radical community makes visible the huge gulfs between communities, between parents and non-parents, in class and other privileges AND most importantly the wide gulf between what we say in activist communities and what we actually do. Radical mothering is the imperative to build bridges that allow us to relate across these very real barriers. For and by radical mother of color, but also inclusive of other working class, marginalized, low income, no income radical mothers.

“Parenting and being a role model to kids in your community is important because they will be the activists of tomorrow.  And they will be our gardeners and mothers and bakers. They will question our generation, they’ll write their own history, create new forms of art and media.” -Noemi Martinez 2009

We find the idea of the “bridge” useful because we believe that  the radical practice of mothering is at once a practical and visionary relationship to the future IN the PRESENT, a bridge within time that can inspire us to relate to each other intentionally across generation and space.   We also acknowledge the not-so-radical default bridge function of marginalized mother in society.  How our children in particular get walked all over in terms of public policy that criminalizes our mothering and movement spaces that claim to be creating a transformed future without being fully accountable to parents or kids.

“I came into the Third World Women’s Caucus when it was well under way.  The women there were discussing the caucus resolution to be presented to the general conference.  There were Asian women, Latin women, Native Women and Afro-American women.  The discussion when I came in was around the controversial issue of motherhood and how the wording of the resolution could best reflect the feelings of those present.  It was especially heartening to hear other women affirm that not only should lesbian mothers be supported but that all third world women lesbians share in the responsibility for the care and nurturing of the children of individual lesbians of color…Another woman reminded us of the commitment we must take to each other when she said ‘All children (of lesbians) are ours.” -Doc in Off Our Backs 1979

We see this book as a continuation of the accountability invoking movement midwifing work of the 1981 anthology This Bridge Called My Back in that it:

a. is the work of writers who see their writing as part of a mothering practice, as not career, but calling and who believe that their writing, and their every creative practice has a strategic role in transforming the possible world.
b. contextualizes contemporary radical mama practices in relationship to socialist and lesbian mothering practices experimented with and practiced in the 1970’s by writers including Audre Lorde, June Jordan, Adrienne Rich, Third World Lesbians conference, Salsa Soul Sisters, Sisterhood of Black Single Mothers
c. seeks to speak to those who participated in that earlier practice and who have been informed by it as a primary audience, and to connect those who have not have access to that work to it

We invite submissions including but not limited to the following possibilities:

  • Manifestas, group poems, letters, mission statements from your crew of radical mamas or an amazing group from history
  • Letters, poems, transcribed phone calls between radical mamas supporting each other*Accounts of your experience as a radical mama
  • Your experience raising children as a trans mother or parent
  • Raising children in a transphobic world
  • Your experiences as a single mother
  • Raising genderfree babies
  • Stories of resilience and oppression as welfare warriors
  • Reflections on enacting radical mamacity at different ages
  • Motivations for/obstacles in your practice of radical mothering
  • Conversations with your kids
  • Rants and rages via the eloquence of a mother-wronged
  • Your experience of radical grandmothering
  • Parenting children through radically queer and loving modes of support, community, belonging and resilience
  • Your take on reproductive justice
  • Parenting from inside prison
  • Extended family (both biological and chosen)
  • Life as a disabled parent
  • Your experience parenting as a teenager
  • Raising Boys
  • Gender socialization and Parenting
  • Raising Biracial children
  • Raising First World children
  • Self-interviews, interviews with other mamis
  • Birthing experiences
  • Ending child sexual abuse
  • Mothering as survivors (survival and mothering)
  • Mothering with and without models
  • Mothering and domination
  • Mama to-do lists
  • Mama/kid collaborations…
  • Radical fathering
  • Overcoming shame and silence in the practice of radical mothering
  • Ambivalence, paradox, emotions, vulnerability
  • Experiences of state violence/CPS
  • Balancing daily survival
  • Loss of children, not living with children, custody arrangements and issues
  • Sharing your stories from where you live
  • Everything we haven’t thought of yet! Take a deep breath and WRITE!!!!

This anthology will center the writing of mothers of color, low income mothers and marginalized mothers. If you have any further questions, feedback, suggestions feel free to contact us as well.

Please send submissions via email to:
alexispauline@gmail.com
maiamedicine@gmail.com
and china410@hotmail.com
or via snail mail to
P.O. Box 4803 Baltimore Maryland 21211

by April 1, 2011.

Word Count: 6,000 words or under

Please also send your bio (a short paragraph or whatever size you like) with the understanding you can update it if your piece is accepted in June.

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Call For Submissions: Dear Sister: Letters to Survivors of Sexual Violence

Below is a call for submissions from Lisa Factora-Borchers of  My Ecdysis:

“Survival is testament of someone’s strength.
Healing is testament of the community surrounding her.” –LFB

Call For Submissions: Dear Sister: Letters to Survivors of Sexual Violence

Dear Sisters

Dear Sister, edited by Lisa Factora-Borchers, is an anthology of letters and other works created for survivors of sexual violence from other survivors and allies.  It is a collection of hope and strength through words and art.

The pathway for a survivor of rape and sexual violence is an unlit road of pain, isolation, and doubt.  In the weeks, months, and oftentimes, years following, the healing process can be difficult to navigate without a community surrounding her. Imagine a compilation of literary arms bound together to offer words of understanding, solidarity, and love.   Dear Sister is an accessible and inclusive offering of hope, voice, and courage; seeking writers and artists who wish to light a piece of that road and lift up other women in her healing.

It is an impossible task to write a letter to every survivor of rape, to every woman who lives with an invisible scar.  Instead of thinking of the face of the person you are writing to, reflect on the image of an unlit path, a road with no clear footing. Your offering will be one light, among many, to make visible what was previously unseen, to illuminate what was hidden.  You are providing a few more steps for someone to walk steadily toward their own recovery.  Your words can be an anchor, a meditation, a prayer, a strong embrace or a gentle touch. The purpose of this anthology is not to retell stories of assault, but to help others regain a sense of balance and wholeness.

Mindfully move beyond what is commonly said and reflect upon radical companionship. Write what you wish for her to know and never forget.  And if you lose focus, look deep into a mirror and reflect: What would you want to be told if you were in the darkness?

Information

Dear Sister primarily seeks letters but will accept poems, prose, essay, and drawn art that can be scanned for entry.  Maximum word count is 1000.

Deadline for submission is November 1, 2010.

Women and transpeople of any race, creed, background, citizenship or non-citizen, ability, and identity are encouraged to submit their words and work to uplift others in the healing stages of post trauma and violence.  Both English and Spanish are accepted. All questions can be directed to dearsisteranthology@gmail.com

Submission can be emailed as an attachment with “Dear Sister Entry” in the subject to dearsisteranthology@gmail.com.

Hand written letters can addressed and mailed to

Dear Sister Anthology
P.O. Box 202468
Cleveland, Oh 44120

Note from the Editor

Rape and sexual violence thrive in the silence of our homes and communities. Outreach must be wide and intentional if we are seek to hear from those who are silenced. Please forward this to as many individuals, groups, organizations, listserves, websites, and agencies that come to mind.

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Call for Submissions: Occupied Bodies: Women of Color Speak on Self-Image

Below is a call for submissions from Tasha Fierce at Red Vinyl Shoes:

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS – Occupied Bodies: Women of Color Speak on Self-Image
Deadline October 15, 2010

I am soliciting essays for an anthology on women of color’s self-image/body image as shaped by family, friends, media, society, history, lived experiences, etc. I’m looking for smart, accessible, and snappy personal narratives that also offer nuanced analysis of the underlying constructs that affect how we perceive ourselves. Exploring intersectionality of identities is extremely important. I particularly want the voices of women of color that are not often heard to be represented, such as trans* WOC, disabled WOC, queer WOC, WOC outside the U.S., WOC with eating disorders, working class/poor WOC and fat WOC. Of course, all the varied perspectives any woman of color can offer are welcome.

This is an exciting project, as this topic has not been explored in depth and including such a diverse collection of viewpoints before. The final manuscript will be submitted to relevant independent publishers.

——
Some possible jumping off points include, but are not limited to:

  • What images of yourself were instilled in you by your parents/guardians/other family members when you were a young child? What positive or negative encounters with adults as a child helped shape that image?
  • If you were born in a country other than the U.S. and then immigrated to the U.S., how did the society in which you were born play a role in your developing self-image, and what contrasts did you find difficult to navigate between the two societies?
  • How did the media you consumed as a child/teen shape your body/self image today? How does it complicate it? How does the media you consume NOW affect your body/self image?
  • How did pressure from family and friends affect the way you perceived yourself after you were old enough to take care of yourself?
  • How did you feel about societal beauty and body standards as a teen? Did you rebel, or conform by any means necessary to avoid confrontation?
  • How has the globalization and dissemination of the Western beauty ideal affected you and women of color worldwide?
  • Debunk this: “in some cultures they ______”, – deconstructing a commonly held belief about an ethnic group’s relation to body (such as the black community supposedly being OK with fat).
  • If you’re queer, how has being a queer woman of color affected your self-image and how you desire your partner to look? If you’ve had partners who were also women of color, did/do you gaze upon them with the same critical eye you reserve for yourself? Why or why not?
  • If you’re a trans* WOC, how was your perception of your gender identity shaped? How has your self/body image changed over the years and have there been any other shifts in your thinking about your self/body image? How does being a WOC interact with your trans* identity? How does it affect how other people perceive you and your gender?
  • How has being a disabled WOC affected your body/self image? Do you feel it’s a detriment or a positive part of your person? How did you come to terms with your disability, or has it never been problematic for you?
  • As a fat WOC, has weight shaped your self/body image your whole life? Have you developed an eating disorder? Was it exacerbated by there being virtually no resources for women of color, especially for fat WOC?
  • Are you a sexual assault/rape survivor? How did that trauma affect your view of yourself?

——-
If your experiences overlap on any of the suggested jumping off points, PLEASE feel free to explore that.

Guidelines:

  • Deadline for submissions is October 15, 2010;
  • Submissions should be saved in Word format or Rich Text, double spaced, size 12 Arial or Times New Roman;
  • 500 to 5,000 words;
  • Include RELIABLE contact information and a brief biography;
  • Only e-mail submissions will be accepted, however, if you can’t arrange that please contact me and we’ll work something out.
  • Send submissions to: occupiedbodies@gmail.com;
  • Again, the deadline for submissions is October 15, 2010.

Who I Am:
The woman spearheading this project is Tasha Fierce, a freelance writer who also happens to be a fat, queer, disabled woman of color. I’ve written about race politics, fat acceptance, disability and feminism in several zines, including Evolution of a Race Riot and the zine I edited from 1998-2001, Bitchcore. I have contributed to Jezebel several times, the fat acceptance blog Shapely Prose, the race & pop culture blog Racialicious, and the feminist disability activism blog FWD/Forward. My work has also been featured in The Huffington Post. I live, love and write in Los Angeles, California. You can regularly read me at my own blog, Red Vinyl Shoes (http://redvinylshoes.com/blog) and on Twitter as @redvinylshoes.

A PDF copy of this call for submissions can be found here.

Donations are greatly appreciated. All donations will only be used to cover costs and time spent getting the anthology to print. Please go to this page to donate.

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Share Your Photos of May Day Direct Action for Immigration Safety & Justice!

We’d love to post your photos of women of color and queer/trans people of color at the May Day marches for immigration and workers’ justice!

Please send photos to incite.news@gmail.com and include the following info:

  • where the photo was taken
  • name of person who took the photo, for attribution
  • any other caption you’d like to provide

Please e-mail your photos by Monday, May 10th!

Here are some pictures of members of INCITE! LA at the May 1st Los Angeles demonstration:

Photo by Patricia Torres

Photo by Patricia Torres

Photo by Patricia Torres

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El Mundo Zurdo: An International Conference on Anzaldúan Thought and Art and Performance

The Society for the Study of Gloria E. Anzaldúa (SSGA) and the Women’s Studies Institute at the University of Texas at San Antonio presents El Mundo Zurdo: An International Conference on Anzaldúan Thought and Art and Performance. The Conference will be held November 5-7, 2010 in San Antonio, Texas.

The Society for the Study of Gloria E. Anzaldúa seeks submission of proposals for papers, panels of 3-4 papers, roundtables, workshops, or performances for its International Conference on the work and life of Gloria E. Anzaldúa. El Mundo Zurdo seeks to provide a place for scholars, students, and community to come together with the intention of engaging in the continued study of Anzaldúa’s intellectual and spiritual work. We welcome proposals involving all facets of Anzaldúa’s life and work as they pertain to the arts– literary, dramatic, plastic, etc—and performance.

The following tracks are merely suggested conceptual groupings for panel and performance presentations:

• BORDERS—explorations of border theory, borderlands ethos and other concepts of Anzaldúan thought focused on this key concept of her work
• GENDER AND SEXUALITY STUDIES—el mundo zurdo and the atravesados, key to Anzaldúa’s thinking and application of her philosophical work
• EDUCATION—pedagogical concerns surrounding her literary and philosophical works. Some questions that may arise: what are some challenges of teaching Anzaldúa? How does Anzaldúa’s thought apply to teaching?
• INTERNATIONAL AND TRANFRONTERA—The effects of globalization and market economies on culture. What is the status of Anzaldúa studies at the international level?
• SPIRITUALITY—Explorations of Anzaldúa’s spiritual teachings. How can we heal the earth and ourselves?
• ART AND PERFORMANCE—The impact of Anzalduan thought on any of the literary, dramatic, and plastic arts, as well as on performance and performance art.

Guidelines:
Proposals must include the following:
• 250-word proposal narrative
• 100-word abstract suitable for publication in the conference program book
• Submissions for Panels must include proposals and abstracts for each paper and the name, address, phone number(s), e-mail address, and institutional affiliation of each participant
• Audio/visual needs
• Contact person’s name, address, phone number(s), e-mail address, and institutional affiliation

All materials must be electronically date-stamped by May 1, 2010 (deadline will be strictly enforced). Proposers will be notified of acceptance in late May.

Questions about the submission process may be sent to: gloria.anzaldua.society@gmail.com or norma.cantu@utsa.edu. More information about the conference can be found at http://colfa.utsa.edu/English/mundozurdo.html.

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Call for Submissions: Race, Racism, and the Sex Industry/Sex Trades

From $pread blog:

For our summer issue, $pread is proud to host a guest editorial collective of US-based sex workers and allies of color. The issue will explore race and racism within the sex industry/sex trades in the United States. How do you feel your racial identity affects your experience in the sex industry/sex trades or in sex worker rights movements? We are seeking articles from people of color of all backgrounds, including people identifying as part of immigrant communities.

Features pitches (a short 250-word write-up of your idea for an article of 2000-3000 words) should be sent to race@spreadmagazine.org, with the heading labeled by the section in which your piece might fit. Also listed below are some ideas for the regularly featured columns in $pread; if you would like to submit content for any of these, please send us a short pitch with details. Our deadline for pitches is April 15 at the latest, so please send your paragraph-length pitch in ASAP. The content deadline for full articles will be May 10, 2010.

**Are you a new/inexperienced writer but have a great story idea and want help developing it? Send in your idea and add a note indicating that you want support.

More info here: http://www.spreadmagazine.org/blog/?p=520

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